Drink Clean Water

Drink Clean Water

Q & A on Drinking Clean Water

It’s summertime, we’re having more fun in the sun, sweating, and realizing we need to do a better job staying hydrated- aka, drink water, drink clean water! It is important! The average adult body is approximately 60% water! The percentage does vary due to muscle mass versus fat composition. Did you know muscles hold more water than fat! So, when we’re getting in shape, or just outdoors having fun and sweating, it’s important to stay hydrated. Here are my most common Questions & Answers on water, and putting salt or minerals back into your water!

Frequently Asked Questions :

Q: I’ve been told I need a reverse osmosis water filter, is this true?
A: No. The ideal fix is a Berkey Water Filter. Pour your tap water in it daily and follow the Berkey instructions for maintenance and upkeep of the water filter unit. (units are sold at the Nutritional Healing Center of Ann Arbor). You can also purchase Berkey water filters for your showerhead!

Q: I’ve been told I need to drink ph balanced water or “alkaline water” is that true?
A: No, the ph primarily affects our mouth, esophagus, and stomach as we drink it. Our stomach ph is the most acidic in the body. There is no reason we need to drink alkaline water to reduce the acidity in our stomach. Ultimately this only serves to impair digestion and reduce mineral breakdown and absorption.

Q: How do I drink the best water and what can I do to change right now?Berkey Water Filter
A:

  1.  Buy a Berkey Water Filter.
  2.  If you don’t have the budget for a Berkey, buy Distilled water.
  3.  Add minerals to your water:
    a.) Add Selena’s Naturally Vital Grey Mineral Blend Celtic Sea Salt to EVERY glass of distilled water to add the minerals back to it. Just a pinch will do! It doesn’t need to taste salty!
    Or
    b.) Buy Spectramin or Spectralyte (liquid mineral supplement) and add that as directed by your practitioner to each glass of water.

Q: Why do I need to add minerals to my water?
A: Water is rehydrating, but it can also strip our body of minerals, especially when it is deficient in minerals and when too much is consumed. The best way to drink water is filtered with a Berkey and add minerals.

Q: How much water should I drink in a day?
A: This varies very much from person to person. An initial goal is 50% of your body weight in ounces. For example, if you weigh 160 lb, you should drink 80 ounces of water per day.

Q: If I drink juice, tea, and coffee, does that count toward my water intake for the day?
A: No. Juice is filled with sugar, coffee and tea are not water although they are steeped in water. All of these modify our hydration and do not hydrate like water with minerals does.

Q: I hate water, I just can’t drink it. Can I do anything to give it a taste?
A: Ideally you learn to drink it. Meanwhile, cut an orange, lemon, lime, strawberry, blueberry or cucumber. Let a slice steep in the water, it will alter the taste and smell which may help you drink it easier.

Q: If I exercise do I need to drink more water?
A: Yes, typically when you exercise, if you are breaking a sweat, you will need to replenish the hydration in your body. Summertime is sneaky. If you are doing outdoor activities, you may not notice you are sweating because it may be evaporating off from the sun. Be sure to drink extra water when exercising. Ask your practitioner for help finding out what amount is right for you based on your body size, type, and exercise frequency and duration.

Q: If I drink coffee, tea or other caffeinated products, do I need to drink more water?
A: Yes. For example, if you have a 10-ounce glass of coffee in the morning, you should drink a 20-ounce glass of water with your minerals to offset the dehydrating effects of the coffee.

Q: I don’t ever feel thirsty, does that mean I don’t need water?
A: Typically our body cannot distinguish between thirst and hunger. You may not “feel thirsty” but yes, you still need to rehydrate your body with clean, mineralized water. The human body is approximately 70% water, we need to keep it hydrated for healthy cellular activity, along with healthy elimination and lymphatic cleansing.

Q: Can I drink all my clean water for the day at one time and just get it done with?
A: No. You should drink water regularly all day long. If your goal is to drink 80 ounces of water in a day, you can certainly buy a 20-ounce water bottle, fill it 4 times, and drink it morning, early afternoon, mid-day, and in the evening. But excess amounts of water all at one time are harsh on the body and the kidneys to manage.

Q: Do I need to drink clean water when I’m fasting or during a low carb or ketosis diet?
A: Yes! Insulin effects water retention. You ‘ll notice when you change your diet to lowering carbs, you will urinate more frequently. This happens during a fast as well. Be sure to replenish your water during this time of increased urination.

If you need help understanding how to replenish your minerals when drinking water, schedule a visit with your practitioner today!

Best in health,
Kristen Clore, OTR, Nutrition Response Practitioner®

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Hormones and Food Cravings

Hormones and Food Cravings

Do you ever feel like you can’t get enough snacks in the day or that you’re never full?

Did you know that your hormones can be the culprit?

Many of us think of hormones as substances in the body which are uncontrolled. The definition of “hormone” in the book, Lick the Sugar Habit, by Nancy Appleton, Ph.D. is as follows: “a chemical produced by a gland and secreted into the blood that affects the function of distant cells or organs.” Our endocrine system is largely responsible for our hormone production. Did you know that endocrine glands and their hormones do not only target reproduction, growth, and development, but also help to regulate metabolism and digestion, electrolyte balance, blood pressure, body temperature, and elimination?

super foods

Good fats to eat anytime!

So how does food impact hormones and what can I do to help regulate my body?

The easiest place to start is to eliminate white sugar and refined foods which spike blood glucose and insulin. In the book, Life Without Bread by Christian Allen Ph.D. and Wolfgang Lutz MD, it is emphasized that “carbohydrate consumption has a direct effect on hormonal balance.” We have been taught the following falsehoods, 1) to eat many small meals or snacks during the day and 2) that it does not matter what type of calorie you eat. The truth is that when we follow those two rules, we are eating increased carbohydrates and sugar, and decreased healthy fat and protein. Carbohydrates bring about a much larger production of insulin. Insulin’s job is to transport glucose to be used immediately as energy, or to store it as fat for later use. When we do not continuously snack, and our insulin levels are low, our body has the opportunity to use a different hormone, glucagon to metabolize fat. But, if we keep snacking, we do not allow our body to switch to fat metabolism. This yo-yo effect on our blood glucose keeps us addicted to all varieties of sugar and especially processed refined snacks.

If you find that you constantly feel hungry, this may be why! To reduce your cravings, start with the first meal of the day, breakfast! Be sure to increase your healthy fats and proteins, and reduce or eliminate processed foods and refined sugars.

Healthy living and proper nutrition are essential for overall health and well-being. If you haven’t started on your journey to overall health, call and schedule your new patient evaluation today!

Yours in health and happiness,
Kristen Clore

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Ignite Your Healing Powers with the Correct Foods and Supplements Now!

Ignite Your Healing Powers with the Correct Foods and Supplements Now!

What exactly are we talking about here?

Inflammation is a normal process that occurs in the body. Inflammation is part of healing. We can ignite your healing powers here at The NHCAA with the correct foods and supplements!

The medical definition of inflammation is: a local response to cellular injury marked by capillary dilatation, leukocytic (white blood cell) infiltration, redness, heat, pain, swelling, and often loss of function and that serves as a mechanism initiating the elimination of noxious agents and damaged tissue. The problems that occur with inflammation happen when the normal inflammation process gets stuck and healing stops.

ignite healing powersSymptoms that can be caused by acute inflammation are a runny nose, stuffy nose, sore throat, cough, illness, headaches, bowel problems (constipation or loose stool), and pain in muscles or joints. Chronic inflammatory states can lead to gum disease, cancers, heart problems or stroke, and arthritis.

The following are a few things that can help the inflammatory process to progress correctly and improve your overall health.

  • Reduce or eliminate inflammatory foods from your diet. Sugar and wheat are highly inflammatory foods. Most people benefit from avoidance of these two foods in particular. Pasteurized cow’s milk is another food that gives many people problems. Your practitioner can help you determine which foods might be best to try to avoid first. Every person is different and foods that cause sensitivities can change from time to time.
  • Minimize exposure to toxins whenever you can. What you put on your skin goes into your body; so, use healthy personal care products whenever you can. Filter your drinking and shower water.
  • Help your immune system. Strengthening your body with the correct foods and supplements can ensure that immune challenges (parasites, fungus, bacteria, and viruses) don’t get out of control.
  • Supplements that can help with inflammation might be probiotics, Vitamin A, C, and D, B vitamins, turmeric, oils (such as fish oils, blackcurrant seed oil, evening primrose), enzymes, zinc, and Boswellia. Ask your Practitioner what might be best for your health goals. Some beneficial foods that you can eat: colorful varieties of vegetables, garlic, ginger, papaya, pineapple, avocado, cinnamon, oregano, and parsley.

I look forward to seeing you soon and helping you ignite your healing powers.

Yours in health,
Kerry Cradit

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Five Keys to Successfully Change Your Diet

Five Keys to Successfully Change Your Diet

I write this article as I am finishing my second Whole30 diet. I have learned a great deal from The NHCAA Whole30 Group that we created on Facebook.

Here are some Keys to Success that you can apply if you are trying to positively change your diet.

1. Structure a Plan/Strategize key-to-success-blog

Planning is a large part of any new endeavor. You have to have the idea of what you want to do along with the tools to do it. When it comes to changing your diet you have to decide what you are trying to accomplish. And then, make lists and shop for the foods you will need to make your meals. Make your goals and write them down.

Strategies that help me are washing and cutting my vegetables ahead of time, cooking soups on Sunday to eat through the week, using a crock pot frequently, and buying small amounts of perishable groceries every few days (so they don’t go to waste).

2. Study

Learn everything you can about what you are doing. The more information you acquire the more likely you understand why the changes are important. There are many good resources on health. Some are: westonaprice.org, http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/dirty_dozen_list.php, http://whole30.com, http://www.schwarzbeinprinciple.com/pgs/home.html.

3. Stamina

Diet changes are a lifestyle change. It can take time to achieve all your health goals. Think of it as a long-term commitment rather than a short-term experiment. Hang in there. Don’t give up. If you experience a setback, start again.

4. Support

Having The NHCAA Whole 30 Group showed me how important support is when you are trying to achieve a goal. There were several times during the Whole 30 that I might have “cheated” if I wasn’t part of a larger group all rooting for each other and trying to achieve the same thing. The support of your spouse, family, friends, and co-workers makes success easier to achieve.

The Practitioners and Staff of The NHCAA can help you and be part of your support team for health and wellness.

5. Succeed!

Decide in advance that you will succeed. Once you have achieved a goal quickly set another one so you keep making improvements.

We plan to continue the Whole30 Facebook group. So, feel free to join us to see what other people are doing to change habits, improve their health, and succeed. Go to Facebook and search The NHCAA Whole 30. And, click to join our group. Let us be a part of your Success!

Yours in health,
Kerry Cradit

Read Kerry’s Bio

Fact Sheet on Fats

Fact Sheet on Fats

Studies from the medical research show a different reality compared to what marketing, media, and medicine say about consuming fat.

This paper is to show the truth about fat. A claim is made followed by the research(es) to back it up.

1. Healthy fats are essential for life and a healthy body!

Functional Roles of Fatty Acids and Their Effects on Human Health. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2015 Sep;39(1 Suppl):18S-32S.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26177664

“A variety of fatty acids exists in the diet of humans, in the bloodstream of humans, and in cells and tissues of humans. Fatty acids are energy sources and membrane constituents. They have biological activities that act to influence cell and tissue metabolism, function, and responsiveness to hormonal and other signals. The biological activities may be grouped as regulation of membrane structure and function; regulation of intracellular signaling pathways, transcription factor activity, and gene expression; and regulation of the production of bioactive lipid mediators.”

You may have heard that trans fats are bad but there is a difference between natural and man-made Trans fats.

2.  Natural Trans fats are not harmful; they are beneficial.

A) Study of the effect of trans fat from ruminants on blood lipids and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease.  

Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Mar;87(3):593-9
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18326596

In studies, researchers use the term “ruminant Trans Fatty Acids” (rTFA) instead of “natural” and they say “industrial Trans Fatty Acids” (iTFA) instead of “man-made”.

“…moderate intakes of rTFA that are well above the upper limit of current human consumption have neutral effects on plasma lipids and other cardiovascular disease risk factors.”

B) Natural Rumen-Derived trans Fatty Acids Are Associated with Metabolic Markers of Cardiac Health.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26210489

“These data suggest that rTFA may have beneficial effects on cardiometabolic risk factors conversely to their counterpart iTFA.”

3. Man-made trans fats (aka industrial Trans fats) are unhealthy.

A) Study of the effect of trans fat from ruminants on blood lipids and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease.  

Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Mar;87(3):593-9
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18326596

“The intake of trans fatty acids (TFA) from industrially hydrogenated vegetable oils (iTFA) is known to have a deleterious effect on cardiovascular health…”

B) Do trans fatty acids from industrially produced sources and from natural sources have the same effect on cardiovascular disease risk factors in healthy subjects? Results of the Trans Fatty Acids Collaboration (TRANSFACT) study.  

Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Mar;87(3):558-66
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18326592

“The HDL cholesterol-lowering property of TFAs seems to be specific to industrial sources.”

C) Overview of trans fatty acids: biochemistry and health effects.

Diabetes Metab Syndr. 2011 Jul-Se:5(3): 161-4
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22813572

“Industrial TFA poses severe effects on our health like cardiovascular problems, insulin resistance, infertility in women, compromised fetal development and cognitive decline.”

4. Now you know there is a difference between natural fats and man-made fats. Unfortunately, many studies do not separate natural fats from man-made fats which leads readers and reporters to think ALL fats are bad or ALL saturated fats are bad. 5 Examples:

A) Major types of dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 May;89(5):1425-32
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19211817

B) Dietary fat intake and risk of coronary heart disease: the Strong Heart Study.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Oct;84(4):894-902.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17023718

C) Dietary Fat and Coronary Heart Disease: Summary of Evidence from Prospective Cohort and Randomised Controlled Trials.

Ann Nutr Metab 209;55:173-201
http://www.nmsociety.org/docs/aboutfat/Skeaff-Dietary-Fat-and-Coronary-Heart-Disease.pdf

D) Effects on coronary heart disease of increasing polyunsaturated fat in place of saturated fat: a systemic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/term=Effects+on+coronary+heart+disease+of+increasing
+polyunsaturated+fat+in+place+of+saturated+fat%3A+a+systemic+review+and+metaanalysis+
of+randomized+controlled+trials
.

The study below combined margarine into the meat category and does not differentiate between industrially raised/grain fed meat versus organically raised meat.

E) Food intake patterns and 25-year mortality from coronary heart disease: cross-cultural correlations in the Seven Countries Study. The Seven Countries Study Research Group.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10485342

5) When the man-made fats and the natural fats are separated, it is seen that there is a difference. Natural fats are ok whereas man-made fats are detrimental.

A) Consumption of industrial and ruminant trans fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease: a systemic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.  

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011 Jul; 659&):773-83 PMID: 2147742 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21427742

“In conclusion, our analysis suggests that industrial-TFA may be positively related to CHD, whereas ruminant-TFA is not…”

6) Some studies show saturated fat does not cause disease even when they don’t separate out the harmful man-made fats.

A) Intake of saturated and trans unsaturated fatty acids and risk of all cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26268692

“Saturated fats are not associated with all cause mortality, CVD, CHD, ischemic stroke, or type 2 diabetes…”

B) Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fats with cardiovascular disease.

Am J clin Nutr. 2010 Mar; 91(3): 535-546 PMID:20071648 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]  PMCID: PMC28241252
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Am+J+clin+Nutr.+2010+Mar%3B+91(3)%3A+535-546

“A meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studies showed that there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD or CVD.”

7) Consuming more vegetable oils and less animal fats is not supported by the research.

Association of Dietary, Circulating and Supplemental Fatty Acids with Coronary Risk: Review and Meta-Analysis Annals of Internal Medicine 2014 correction (of above article):
http://annals.org/article.aspxarticleid=1846638&utm_content=bufferf0af7&utm_medium=social&utm_
source=plus.google.com&utm_campaign=buffer

“Current evidence does not clearly support cardiovascular guidelines that encourage high consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids and low consumption of total saturated fats.”

Don’t be afraid to eat healthy fat! You’re probably not eating enough.

8) Women need higher cholesterol than what current guidelines say.

A) Is the use of cholesterol in mortality risk algorithms in clinical guidelines valid? Ten years  prospective data from the Norwegian HUNT 2 study.  

J Eval Clin Pract.2012 Feb;18(1):159-68
http://www.ncbi.lm.nih.gov/pubmed/19211817

“If our findings are generalizable, clinical and public health recommendations regarding the ‘dangers’ of cholesterol should be revised. This is especially true for women, for whom moderately elevated cholesterol (by current standards) may prove to be not only harmless but even beneficial.”

9) Eating healthy fat helps get you off addictive sugar.

A) Long-term, calorie-restricted intake of a high-fat diet in rats reduces impulse control and ventral striatal D2 receptor signaling: two markers of addiction vulnerability.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26527415

“These data indicate that chronic exposure to even limited amounts of high-fat foods may weaken impulse control and alter neural signaling in a manner associated with vulnerability to addictions…”

10) Eating healthy fat keeps your appetite under control. You can go longer between meals and eat less!

A) Do ketogenic diets really suppress appetite? A systematic review and meta-analysis. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25402637. KLCD means Ketogenic Low Carbohydrate Diet.

“…individuals adhering to KLCD were less hungry and had a reduced desire to eat. Although these absolute changes in appetite were small, they occurred within the context of energy restriction…”

11) Cacao butter has lots of phytosterols which has been shown to reduce unhealthy LDL cholesterol and triglycerides.

Phytosterols, Phytostanols, and Lipoprotein Metabolism.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26393644

“Phytosterols and phytostanols lower LDL cholesterol”. “…phytosterols and phytostanols have modestly reduced serum triglyceride levels”.

12) Consuming saturated fat is healthy.

A) http://freetheanimal.com/2009/09/saturated-fat-intake-vs-heart-disease-stroke.html

“So, more saturated fat, better, more carbohydrate, worse, and protein is not associated.” This immense numbers-crunching study shows the ideal cholesterol number is 200-240 md/dl.

B) 7 Reasons to eat more saturated fat.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/09/22/7-reasons-to-eat-more-saturated-fat.aspx

C) Other resources to consider for learning the health benefits of saturated fat and cholesterol include these search terms online: ketogenic, protein power, Gary Taubes, and Weston A. Price.

Most of the good dietary research was done from the 1920’s until the early 1960’s. For the sake of pride and profit, the big pharmaceutical and big food companies have changed the culture of diet research to what meets their needs and not yours.

Unfortunately, most of the time, funding for medical research only goes to studies that test the current “fat is bad” hypothesis, ignoring the incredible negative effects of grains and sugars which is the main cause of heart disease and overweight/obesity.

13) Here is a study saying sugar is more important in disease than fats. If you want to reduce obesity, overweight, diabetes, and heart disease, it is vital to remove sugar and deuce carbohydrates rather than avoiding fat.

A) The Evidence for Saturated Fat and for Sugar Related to Coronary Heart Disease.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26586275

“This paper reviews the evidence linking saturated fats and sugars to CHD, and concludes that the latter is more of a problem than the former. Dietary guidelines should shift focus away from reducing saturated fat, and from replacing saturated fat with carbohydrates, specifically when these carbohydrates are refined. To reduce the burden of CHD, guidelines should focus particularly on reducing intake of concentrated sugars, specifically the fructose-containing sugars like sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup in the form of ultra-processed foods and beverages.”

What do you want?

What do you want?

A want is a lack or deficiency of something or a wish for something. I want a donut. I want french fries. I want to feel better. With wants impulsive actions often win to fulfill the desire.fee

But, what if we listed our needs and acted on that? A need is to require something because it is essential or very important; circumstances in which something is necessary, or require some course of action. I do not need french fries. I do not need a donut. I need clean water, I need vegetables, I need adequate protein, I need good fats, I need to be healthy so I can take care of my family, work, and live well. These needs take a little more planning to acquire.

There may have been a time prior to 1940’s when a good diet was all that was needed to feel well and be healthy. Now, however, with our soil depleted, toxins all around us, and with genetically modified foods, it is extremely difficult to meet our needs with food alone. The correct supplementation to help your body is a need for nearly everyone.

As a Practitioner, I don’t tell you what to want or what you must do. I help you figure out what you and your body need and what you can do to fulfill those needs.

I want to help you with your health. Do you need it?

Yours in health,
Kerry Cradit

Read Kerry’s Bio